From Sinister Superhero to Carnival Princess

If you’re not already aware, you can download a free PolyFacets plan to make a Superhero mask, right HERE
Because it’s a plan, you can make as many as you want, you can even make smaller ones for the young ‘uns, if you use the resizing guide HERE

This tutorial started life as a “how to patch up a mask that didn’t turn out so well” tutorial (which will be coming soon).
It shows you how to make water-based paints with Mod Podge, and making up a design as you go along with sequin strings, giving you all the help you need, to go from

Batman masks made from my free download

Plain Old Superhero

Carnival Superheroes

To Fabulous Carnival Queen!

Come with me on my messy journey, thrill to the frustration of fiddly sequins and gasp at the audacity of goose feathers, all set to a little bit of Beethoven.

Printer Card Illuminations

After much prototyping and rejigging, here are the first two light designs.
Having had them around for a few weeks now, I’ve decided that I’m going to find an alternative way to make illuminated letters. I’ve tried different ways to give it the support it needs but it inevitably sags and it’s way to complicated to build.
The mushroom, on the other hand, is a lovely thing. I’ve rejigged it so that it’s huge, much bigger than in the photos.

These lights are made mainly from printer card and Mod Podge

These lights are made mainly from printer card and Mod Podge

The outer bodies of the lights are made from two layers of 300gsm card, bonded with Mod Podge, which is also the medium used to bond layers of translucent paper to make the “windows”. In this case, I’ve used mulberry paper but you can use anything which will let the light pass through.

Even in daylight, the lights give a bright and heartwarming display

Even in daylight, the lights give a bright and heartwarming display

Inside each light is another card structure, onto which the lights are securely fixed. There are no electrical tools or knowledge required, and once complete, the lights change colour by remote control.
The “light” parts for the project can be bought for under £10.

You don't need any electrical knowledge to construct these fabulous DIY Mood Lights

You don’t need any electrical knowledge to construct these fabulous DIY Mood Lights

 

Printing and Scaling a Mask Plan – FAQ

I don’t have any software which will open the PDF file.
If you don’t have software to open and print the plan, you can download it for free, here get.adobe.com/uk/reader/

Do I need to print in colour?
Printing the plans requires black ink only.

Will it work with my paper size?
The plans are sized to work with both A4 and US letter paper.

The plans are designed to be printed at 100% (this is for a standard / large adult size) – Select “do not scale” in your printer settings.
Each sheet of the plan has a 100mm line, so you can always check the size by measuring this line on the printed sheets.

I want to make masks in different sizes.
If you want to make the masks smaller, you can use your printer settings to rescale them.
85% is the scale I would use to make a “child size”.

Here are some screenshots, yours may be slightly different, depending upon which printer you have.

Image1

 

1. First, I select which pages to print – just the pages with the plan on, pages 6-12 in this case. Each download tells you which pages you need to print.
2. For a standard, adult sized mask, I select “actual size” – then print.
3. To scale the pages, I select “Properties”
Image2

 

4. Then “Page Setup”

 

Image3

 

5. Select “Scaled” from the Page Layout options
6. Then adjust the figure in the Scaling box and click OK.

85% is the scale I usually choose to make a smaller mask.
The “100 mm” measuring lines will measure 85mm, in this case.

When you come back to the original print settings, “actual size” is still selected and the “print prieview” still shows the pages at full size, but it will print at the scale you have selected.


 

Prototype Superhero Mask

I’m trying to make this one available as a free download as soon as I can. It takes just seven pieces of card, Mod podge, contact adhesive and black paint.

This is the second prototype of the Batman mask freebie.

This is the second prototype of the Batman mask freebie.

This is only the second prototype; it goes together well but there are a few small tabs and some tricky pushing at the end.